Ep. 12: Sailing Single-handed to Azores: Gale Arrival with an Engine Failure

Sailing Bavaria 40 single-handed through a gale to arrival in Horta, Azores. My engine fails as I approach the islands.
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for Ep. 12: Sailing Single-handed to Azores: Gale Arrival with an Engine Failure

marinus
marinus - 3 years ago
You look sleepy. need those naps.
Douglas M
Douglas M - 3 years ago
Wow, just discovered your great channel. You are a great story teller and so interesting. Love all the solo sailing info. Best of luck!
Billy Bob
Billy Bob - 3 years ago
I find it strange that you dont work non stop with fixing the engine
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Super.  It sounds like you have a great passage ahead of you on a great boat.    (I stopped in Punta Delgada on my way back to Spain and thoroughly enjoyed it (though the marina can be a bit rough at times).)   Just a minor point, but you don't really need electricity for some of the things you mentioned: nav can be done very easily with an iPad and Navionics or hand-held GPS; all sailboats carry hand-held VHF; the vast majority of marinas can send out a Zodiak to tow you in the last 300 meters, etc..  As a solo sailor without a wind vane, my biggest concern for electricity is to power my autopilot.  That comes before all else.  (I do have a methanol fuel cell which can recharge my batteries to a certain extent as well.)   Anyway, best wishes for a great passage.   I'm sure you will have a lot of lifetime memories from it.
Billy Bob
Billy Bob - 3 years ago
Thanks for reply and thanks for great videos! I have only watched two but will continue.
About the engine. Im mostly thinking about electricity- navigation,radio etc.and having a motor when arriving at a port. Or if the sails blows to pieces and you are heading towards a reef.
I dont have your knowledge or experience but I personally would not rest until Ive tried absolutally everything to fix the engine.
I will fly to the Azores ( Punta Delgada) in early May and sail a 50 footer Cork Ireland (1100 nautical). I have never been to the Azores and I am watching sailing videos from there to get a hint. thats how I found you videos. Great work and very interesting videos!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Motors on sailboats can be a 'distraction' Billy Bob.  They are most useful for entering and leaving port.  On the  open sea, they lack power to be of much help in a storm.   Moreover, if the problem is fuel contamination, it is best to wait until seas are calm so that the contamination settles back to the bottom of the tank.   Thanks for watching.
guy Marble
guy Marble - 3 years ago
Great job Captain, enjoyed it very much,, Cheers
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Guy.  I learned so much from this passage!   Glad you enjoyed it.
Andrew Williams
Andrew Williams - 3 years ago
Great story thanks for sharing
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks for the kind feedback Andrew.  It was a great little adventure for me.   Am looking forward to the next chapter this Spring!
mynhardt saayman
mynhardt saayman - 3 years ago
I'd love to buy you a beer and pick your mind . This idea of solo sailing I find captivating , but but BUT I am afraid I will be the weakest link in this equation. Any tips on how you manage the solitude and the fear open seas bring?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I think it is a question of building confidence Mynhardt.   I did a few 5 day passages with a professional instructor and crew of 3-4 up the West coast of France.    I then did a few day outings with just me and an instructor in my boat where I did all of the maneuvers solo and explained everything I was doing/thinking (and listened to his feedback).   Then I started doing short 2-3 hour solo sorties in my local operating area.    Gradually I became 'comfortable' (or at least, less stressed) with doing those.  I also took a weekend course with an instructor (and 4 others) where we did dozens of docking maneuvers.   As confidence grew, I did longer solo passages up the coast, and then my first all-nighter into blue water.   All the time, I spoke to seasoned veterans, and listened closely to their advice (though not always follwing it!).   When I felt ready for it, I crossed the Bay of Biscay a few times solo (2.5 days passages), and then my ten day passage to the Azores.   I agree with you that the human part of this will always be the weakest link.   Compensate for this by being conservative in sail settings, and picking your weather window as carefully as possible.   Many thanks for watching and best wishes on your solo passages.
champagne diligent
champagne diligent - 3 years ago
comme d'habitude une video tres didactique d'un tres bon marin. je me regale a chaque episode
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Champagne pour Champagne ! Très gentil de votre part. Ca fait toujours plaisir d'entendre que d'autres vont profiter de mes nombreuses erreurs. A+  ;-)
John Kromhout
John Kromhout - 3 years ago
Phew! After watching this video, I feel as though I made the passage with you--exhausting! I notice that among your many sailing talents is a great mental resiliency that rationally reviews the issues of safety and inventories those separately from issues of comfort and convenience. Noting that, I see that making a difficult passage depends greatly on keeping your wits and not letting fears take over. This also is a good sailing lesson to remember--thanks!
John Kromhout
John Kromhout - 3 years ago
What a lovely story--not in the sense that illness is a happy occurrence--but that your heart and mind were full enough with gratitude for what you had already enjoyed that you could move from flying back to sailing. H-m-m-m, I have to wonder how a young officer got in a situation requiring a French attorney's involvement?...Thanks for your sharing, Patrick. I wish you fair seas and all of this life's comforts for the days ahead.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I learned the basics of sailing when I was young, but then spent the next 40 years living my enthusiasm for aviation, and only seldom getting on a sailboat for a couple of hours.   A bout with cancer a while back made it very difficult to renew my flying licenses, so I sold my plane and decided that when I retired, I'd buy a boat and take up sailing again.  I bought my boat two years ago and have sailed it almost weekly since then.  The French Connection is a story of War and Peace.  As a young Navy fighter pilot I was invited to do a two year exchange with the French Navy.  While there, I discovered Europe and met a lovely young French lawyer, and the rest is history.  No regrets.  :-)
John Kromhout
John Kromhout - 3 years ago
How did you come to live on the French coast and begin sailing?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
My rationale for loving ‘going solo’ is very difficult to articulate John.   When I finished flight school, I immediately applied for single-seat fighters rather than multi-crew aircraft.    I purposely chose a sailboat model that had multiple features designed-in to facilitate solo sailing rather than with a crew.    Perhaps I was not comfortable with being responsible for the life(s) of others.  Or, perhaps I really enjoy the sense of accomplishment in doing something cool/challenging by myself.   On the other hand, in both flying and sailing, there have been countless times when I wished beyond anything that my daughters, or close friends were there to share the incredible thing I was witnessing.    The experience was somehow diminished because I was not able to share it with someone else.   There you go --- the mysteries and contradictions of people who go solo.  J
John Kromhout
John Kromhout - 3 years ago
I wonder what you think makes single-handed sailors go down to the sea (or airplane pilots make transatlantic solo flights)? I personally balance between shear fascination with the engineering of a well-made vessel and the terror of living through the furies of nature that pound it, toss it, and either overwhelm it, or pass it by. In childhood I shuddered with the certain fear that someday I'd perish in a South Pacific sailing wreck. I'd never been on the ocean at that point in time. Later in my early twenties, when I began my first sailing lessons on the San Francisco Bay, I found myself utterly beaten down by sea-sickness. Now, living so far from any blue water shore, I am incapable of not missing the sailing experience, as though the shark-bait fears and sea sickness had never occurred to me. I wonder what to do? Wind the clocks, I suppose, and just ride it out. I'd love to know something of your own history with sailing and its place in your sojourn as a man, a father, and an ex-pat.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks John.  It was a geat little adventure for me.   I may have over-dramatized the nature of the gale a bit, but it is always important to keep calm no matter what.   When I was a young fighter pilot, and all of the alarms in the cockpit started flashing, we were advised (tongue in cheek), "The first thing to do is wind the clock."   In other words, don't go into panic mode and start throwing switches and ignoring the basics.   Take your time, prioritize, and don't forget to fly the plane.   That's a pretty good lesson for sailing too.   :-)    Thanks for watching.
gess ges
gess ges - 3 years ago
I always if I have to break the fuel line Ie filters etc I run the motor for several hours after wards to iron out bugs , do these things the day befor a passage , then in all long passages keep the tank nearly full for sergement in the tank keep going all good thanks
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Yes --- and honestly, that is what I do most of the time Gess.   My 210 liter tank was only down about 50 liters from full when this happened.  That is why, in the middle of the storm, I put 40 liters of additional diesel into the fuel tank (to stop the sloshing effect).   Unfortunately, by then, it was too late.

10. comment for Ep. 12: Sailing Single-handed to Azores: Gale Arrival with an Engine Failure

gess ges
gess ges - 3 years ago
Or alter corse a few degrees and soften the ride for a couple of hours then alter back
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Exactly right Gess, and something I did not think to do because I was so focussed on the idea of forereaching and not running downwind with the storm.   If I had eased heading perhaps just 10 or 15 degrees, I probably would have taken a lot of stress off the rigging without exposing myself to dangerous waves.   Next time.   :-)   Thanks for commenting.
Jeff Parker
Jeff Parker - 3 years ago
Fantastic Patrick, a huge thank you for sharing with us.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
It was a terrific little adventure Jeff --- with lots of learnings for the next one!   Thanks for watching.
BOAT DUDE
BOAT DUDE - 3 years ago
Patrick wish i was out there with you.your cool head and thinking the problum out is great.only thing you need is to have a storm jib on a detachable inner forestay.To sail to windward in heavy weather, you need a flat-cut headsail. A heavily reefed roller genoa typically is anything but flat i see in a number of your video were you have had this problum. keep putting up the videos i love them.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks for the words of encouragement Boat Dude.   I fully learned the lesson about the storm jib, and now have one (the kind that wrap around the furled genny).    My ultimate goal is to install an inner forestay to have a flat stay-sail --- exactly as you describe.   I'll have one installed before I do a trans Atlantic passage for sure.    Thanks for watching.
ArcturanMegadonkey
ArcturanMegadonkey - 3 years ago
Amazing footage!
I have been looking into sailing and found your channel, I consider yours as a 'must watch'
Subscribed, thumbs up
Paul in the UK..Future sailor
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Paul.  I enjoyed sailing in the Solent with some RYA instructors before launching out on my own.    Great fun.  Thanks for watching.
Adam Frisoli
Adam Frisoli - 3 years ago
Great episode and great sailor! You really kept your head, very inspiring stuff!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Adam.  it was a great learning experience for me, and lots of fun as well.   Thanks for watching and commenting.
J Eiden
J Eiden - 3 years ago
Thanks, this was very interesting. I really liked your commentary during the gale. Glad you made it safely. Happy travels!!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks J.   It was a great little adventure.  I learned a lot, and had great fun as well.   Thanks for commenting.
hux Jones
hux Jones - 3 years ago
awesome video, one of the BEST I've seen here on youtube... a dose of reality! Thank you for sharing
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Hux.  It was quite the adventure for this intermediate level sailor.    Great fun too.   Thanks for watching and commenting.
Antonio Coelho
Antonio Coelho - 3 years ago
Love your videos.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Tony.   Much appreciated.
Will Shaw
Will Shaw - 3 years ago
Man, I let out a cheer when saw you on the dock in Horta! THANKS for keeping the GoPro running, even in a gale! Helluvan entertaining story...your can-do attitude is as contagious as it is inspirational. Never met a real salt I didn't like.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Will.   It was a special moment for me for sure.  Thanks for watching and your kind comment.
cvcoco
cvcoco - 3 years ago
just some thoughts, why didnt you have a wind vane which is better than an autopilot in heavy conditions? and why didnt you heave-to and wait it out that way?
cvcoco
cvcoco - 3 years ago
I know people watch for different reasons. There are many lovely and beautiful sailing videos but to me they are not very helpful. I dig into the storm and maintenance videos not to watch a poor sailor capsize but to hear why he took a tactic to hopefully prevent one. My fears in crossing a sea are storms I cant decide how to handle because of mistakes in reading the telltales, running over submerged shipping containers, piracy, and whale ramming. I dont want to see the ramming, I want to hear, "oh crap, i think i just sailed into a pod of resting whales, here is what im doing to get the h-ll away from it." I can only speak for myself, not for myriad people watching for myriad reasons.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I completely agree CVCoco.  The 'why' is most important, followed closely by the 'how'.   I love sailing videos that are strong on those elements.    They are much more interesting than the 'what' videos that capture: "We sail to XXXX this week, catch a tuna along the way, and then walk along the beach."   I'll try to keep better focus this coming season on the Why and How, and just a bit of What to complement the more important part.   Thanks for commenting.
cvcoco
cvcoco - 3 years ago
Patrick, I respect your ability very much which goes to a point I failed to properly make in my first comment. You are out there, alone, in a storm and you have a make a decision. Hindsight is wonderful when a great decision was made. In the face of fears and problems, you made good ones. But how often are they, for the average sailor? I think viewers, I included, would appreciate knowing that process you use to make hard decisions. There are at least two kinds of sailors: "i need to move away from that danger, in another direction," and "i know my boat, I can outrun that (storm, danger, etc) and make land before it does." Im reminded of that girl, the youngest girl to go around the globe. She was in a storm in the Indian Ocean, sitting at her nav table crying because she thought it was the end. She wasnt making any decision at all. Was that the worst thing, doing nothing? Then there is a video in YT of a mayday at sea in a storm and the sailors abandoned their boat and were rescued. Days later, the boat shows up completely intact. Their decision to abandon was wrong. So, how did you decide what to do and then do it? When you are on the boat and making hard decisions in the middle of fears, say in the videos why/how you are doing so. Thats what would be so helpful to viewers education. Personally I dont watch these stories for fun, I need the education and help. Again, thank you so much for replying.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks CV.  Good comment.   I made a lot of "sub-optimum" decisions during the trip, but one of the best decisions I made was to head for open sea when the gale kicked up.    I felt so much better getting well-clear of land, and then again later when I  resisted the urge to turn back to the island early.     I hope I have the good sense to do the same thing next time.    My boat is now with me at home in La Rochelle France, and we are planning a trip to the Shetland Islands and beyond in April.   Best regards
cvcoco
cvcoco - 3 years ago
Hello Patrick, thanks for the reply and the video. Let me say first im not in any way against you, im definitely enjoying your videos. Im sure everyone shares the same concerns about being able to reach the intended destinations--ALIVE--so I come from that angle. In the Storm Tactics book which is devoted to heaving-to, the problem is being able to figure out early enough that the tactic is necessary and get into position while one can because a point comes when it cant be done, then one may possibly be left to surf under bare poles until the aft waves overtake you and then it may be curtains. I was happy to see you turn away from land to gain sea room. Ive known sailors who tried to make land during a storm only to wind up on the rocks. Im on the way to the next video to learn the fate of the engine. I really appreciate you taking the time to reply, good points there. Where are you now?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Others have asked the 'heave to' question before CVCoco, so I'll just copy a previous response:  You are of course right that heaving to would have unloaded the sails quite a bit.  I made a half-hearted attempt to do so.  However, the wind backed so rapidly from NW to SW that the swell was far out of alignment with the wind, and I rapidly took two small waves over the stern quarter into the cockpit.  (The technical term is getting pooped on.)  I then switched to the foreaching tactic that you saw in the video.  The other option would have been to run downwind with the storm which greatly reduces stress on the rigging/sails, but then you remain in the gale for another day or more and can quickly lose 120 NM that you then have to beat against to get to destination.   I think the best strategy is to keep all three options under serious consideration when encountering any gale, and then making the most-reasoned decision depending on the actual circumstances (state of equipment, availability or not of storm sails, amount of lee margin, sea state, etc.).    I learned a great deal during this adventure.I didn't want to install a wind vane just for a 10 day passage.   I was happy with the performance of my autopilot during this passage.  My only concern was the energy being used, but my fuel cell (coupled with energy management) handled that well.   If I do a transat, I'll probably install a wind vane as you suggest.   Thanks for watching CV.

20. comment for Ep. 12: Sailing Single-handed to Azores: Gale Arrival with an Engine Failure

Sailing Kittiwake
Sailing Kittiwake - 3 years ago
Great job Patrick! It must have been so disheartening to be so close to the destination and be clobbered like that. You seemed so calm and in control the whole time, an inspiration to all of us rookie skippers. While I was watching I was thinking 'would heaving to have put less strain on the sails?' But I see you spoke about that in comments below. I guess it's important to have many different options to deal with these situations. Our AIS is now fully installed by the way, but I've only used it in the boatyard, not out at sea. I think I'll take a similar approach as you and if there's any doubt about a ship's proximity, give them a call on the radio.
All the best,
Ryan and Elena
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks to my friends on Kittiwake. You are of course right that heaving to would have unloaded the sails quite a bit. I made a half-hearted attempt to do so. However, the wind backed so rapidly from NW to SW that the swell was far out of alignment with the wind, and I rapidly took two small waves over the stern quarter into the cockpit. (The technical term is getting pooped on.) I then switched to the foreaching tactic that you saw in the video. The other option would have been to run downwind with the storm which greatly reduces stress on the rigging/sails, but then you remain in the gale for another day or more and can quickly lose 120 NM that you then have to beat against to get to destination. I think the best strategy is to keep all three options under serious consideration when encountering any gale, and then making the most-reasoned decision depending on the actual circumstances (state of equipment, availability or not of storm sails, amount of lee margin, etc.). I learned a great deal during this adventure. Thanks so much for watching, and best wishes on your own continuing journey (which I follow with great interest).
Kauana Sailing Expedition
Kauana Sailing Expedition - 3 years ago
I love this video!! Watched it a few times already!!!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Very kind of you.   Lots of mistakes to learn from!   I have been a silent admirer of you guys since Prumirim Beach.  It's been great following the two of you through your boat purchase/refit adventure in the cold North, and you have already proven yourselves to be great sailors on some quite challenging passages.   Looking forward to the next video.  :-)
Brad Enns
Brad Enns - 3 years ago
You....as the younger folk would say....are a stud! Great decision making and patience! Very impressed!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I'm off to the Shetland Islands in the Spring, and from there either to Norway or the Faroe Islands, depending on the wind.   Some cold wx sailing ahead!   Very best.
Brad Enns
Brad Enns - 3 years ago
Patrick Laine Ha, yes we all wish to be young again, but it appears you haven't let Father Time get in your way. Great videos on your adventures so far! As I transition to retirement, and plan to start sailing soon, videos like yours are truly an inspiration. I've been around boats all my adult life, but none with wind power....your videos are helping me learn what I need to learn. Again, thank you for your voluntary service! Also, where are you sailing to next?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks again Brad.  I flew the A7E Corsair II in the US Navy, and did an exchange with the French Navy where I flew the Super Etendard.    Great memories.  Wish I were 22 years old again so I could do the same thing all over.  :-)
Brad Enns
Brad Enns - 3 years ago
Patrick Laine The old salts I know would applaud your decisions. Appreciate your humility. By the way, thank you for your service!! What type of aircraft did you fly?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Old salts will laugh at my multiple errors Brad.   The good news is that none of my mistakes were too serious.   Moreover, I learned a great deal about sailing and my boat.  I will be better prepared the next time.   Many thanks for the kind words.
Robin Patterson
Robin Patterson - 3 years ago
I would sail with you any time. Some people get in such a panic as the wind gets up. You certainly understand that it's 90 percent noise. The boat is designed to sail. The silly issue with the engine, was I'm sure a pain in the neck BUT once again, you just went back to sailing. Really did my heart good to see you level of competence and your calm manner. Nicely done
Robin Patterson
Robin Patterson - 3 years ago
Good point. I try to think the same way. I have sailed into a marina, BUT there is really no point. I was just being a little too cocky. It turned out fine, but I would be the first one to admit, it's an LAST RESORT. Sailing in and out of an anchorage, , , , not a big deal. I will watch more of your videos. I don't care for the videos of people that ACT like they are God's gift to the rest of us. I much prefer watching Calm down to earth people with good competence. Take care and good sailing
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Very kind of you Robin. Much appreciated. I was a bit disappointed that I spent as much time as I did (which was not a lot) worrying about the engine. I felt SO MUCH better when I just got sailing again and took control of the boat. A key lesson in aviation (I am an ex-pilot) is to never become distracted by incidental stuff or non-essential equipment failures. That same lesson certainly applies to sailing as well. Many thanks for watching.
Hayden Watson
Hayden Watson - 3 years ago
I have found that in the situation you describe at 0:40 that if you roll out about 6' - 8' of your roller furling jib you will point very high and be able to motorsail at hull speed.  just that little bit of pull form the head sail will allow you to punch through the wave instead up riding up over them and slamming off the back. I had a similar passage in 35 knots in the Straight or Georgia and my daughter was able to sleep in the vee birth.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Funny you should mention that Hayden.   Just yesterday I was in a chandlery looking at various chafe protection devices to mount on the spreaders.    I have never had a problem with chafe on the sheets before.  My chafe incident in this video occurred because the chafe protector around the shroud failed, and IT exposed a sharp edge to the sheet.  (Irony.)   That said, it may be a good idea to have either leather or rubber protection on hand.  I'll see if these things are available where I live.  Thanks for the suggestion.
Hayden Watson
Hayden Watson - 3 years ago
This is a great solution for those times when you need to motor directly to windward. The beauty of this method is that you already have everything you need already rigged and can deploy it from the cockpit. You mentioned that you had chafe on you genoa sheets. I used to keep a pair of leather chafe guards on my jib sheets that I could slide to whatever location I needed but recently saw these and think I might give them a try. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lrtlK8jDb0
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I agree with your calculation Hayden -- in fact the storm jib I bought is 8 m2.    I really like what you have described.   I'm heading up to the North Sea this Spring, so am absolutely certain that I will have an opportunity to test the tactic.   ;-)   Now that I understand a little better what I am try to do/accomplish, I'll probably have more success this time.   I'll try to remember to send you a note on how it works.  Heck, I'll film it and describe the tactic on YouTube so others can then decide whether or not they want to test it on their boats.   Thanks for the great contribution.
Hayden Watson
Hayden Watson - 3 years ago
If you let out 8' assuming a 2.5:1 I/LP ratio you will have a luff length of 20' with LP of 8'. That results in about 80 square feet (7.4m^2) of sail area. That is about right for a storm jib and the furler loads are quite a bit lower due to the small exposed area. I use this any time I need to motor into a significant head wind. Motoring at 0º apparent wind, I let out a bit of sail and sheet it in tight. I usually apply a little tension on the lazy sheet as well to pull the sail closer to centerline. I then fall off just far enough to get the jib to fill and start pulling. On my passage in St, Georgia I went from 1.7knts. to 7 knots and only needed to fall off about 20º and there was no more rising to the top of the wave face and slamming off the back. The best part is that everything can be done from the cockpit. After everything is settled it would be good to but some chafe guard on the sheets.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I think that is very good advice Hayden.   I may have tried that, but without enough conviction.  I think what I really need for the future is an inner forestay with a jib for heavy weather so I could easily do exactly what you are suggesting.  (My headsail is a 145% genoa; it doesn't take unfurling very much to have a LOT of canvas out.)   I will give your suggestion a try the next time just to see if I can sleep in the vee berth.  I like the idea of punching through those waves with power, rather than crashing up and down them.     Thanks very much for commenting.
Wilf Rennecke
Wilf Rennecke - 3 years ago
You are a TRUE AND REAL SAILOR !!!!! Can't help but LOVE YOU !!! Should you ever come to the west coast of British Columbia, my wife and I would love to have you as a guest.Where do you hail from ?we sail a Panda 40, only coastal though.Take care and safe voyaging ! Bonnie and Wilf
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
PS my mother was Canadian, but from the other coast.  :-)
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Well hello to Bonnie and Wilf in British Columbia.  I love watching videos of people sailing Juan de Fuca.  Some serious currents and weather there for sure.   I sincerely hope to make it there one day, and will be sure to take you up on a free beer on that occasion.   Thanks so much for the kind words.
RoadGoose
RoadGoose - 3 years ago
Hi Patrick - great videos - I've been keeping an eye on your yellow/black binoculars on the table in the cockpit - were they tied down??

They make many cameo appearances! would hate to think there was risk they could end-up going over the side...
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks RoadGoose. The binoculars survived the passage just fine! You are right though. They could have easily flipped off the table due to an awkward wave. I have a wooden holder for them just above my head at the chart desk. I'll try to replace them there in the future. Thanks for watching.
Roz Marie
Roz Marie - 3 years ago
Well done!!!! Isabelle, what a lovely name ! Congrats
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Roz Marie. Much appreciated. Thanks for watching.
David Ledbetter
David Ledbetter - 3 years ago
Yep, guys, that is how you do it. Never pressure it, just deal with it.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Very kind of you David.  Lots of mistakes made, but it all came right in the end.  :-)    Thanks for watching.
ivan lopez
ivan lopez - 3 years ago
Patrick, what month of the year was that? Great videos, thank you for sharing !!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Ivan.   I arrived Horta, Azores on May 15th, 2017.   The trip normally would have taken 9 days or so from Viveiro, Spain, but I ended up spending 1.5 days sitting out the gale (this episode 12).  Thanks for watching.

30. comment for Ep. 12: Sailing Single-handed to Azores: Gale Arrival with an Engine Failure

How to Sail Oceans
How to Sail Oceans - 3 years ago
Nice vid! I take it you have slab reefing and did not run the third reef line through the leech cringle before heading offshore. Well I assume that is now on your passage checklist ... I see why you purchased the storm jib, the deep reefed headsail looked to be flogging rather severely in those conditions. You looked very happy to make it into port after all that ...
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
The diesel bug is caused by a combination of two things Kevin: 1) the presence of water (from condensation, contamination or a leak), and 2) low sulfur fuel. The organisms live in the water, and feed on the (now) non-toxic diesel. It's usually not a problem ---- until you get into 3-4 meter seas and the organisms are lifted off the bottom and get sucked into the fuel lines....... It's actually a quite common cause of diesel engine failure now. The cure is regular use of biocides, water separating fuel filters (Racor), and occasional ''diesel polishing' where you run the entire tank through a filtration system. Enjoy the Virgin Islands. I sailed St Thomas many, many years ago and still have fond memories of that. Best.
How to Sail Oceans
How to Sail Oceans - 3 years ago
Yes, chuckled a little, admittedly ... wow, North Sea to Norway, you are ambitious. I'll stay where it's warm, thanks. Btw, micro-organisms in diesel fuel? What in the world has evolved to grow in diesel which has only been on earth a century or so?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Kevin.   It was a great 'learning experience' for this intermediate level sailor.....and I took full advantage of the 'learning' part.   :-)   I am going to try to apply those learnings with a trip up across the North Sea to Norway next Spring.     And yes, a partially furled genoa is really very unsatisfactory in a gale.   Fortunately, my is made of radial hydranet, so is practically indestructible.   I don't want to test it like that again though.   Also, you, who never use an engine, must have had a good chuckle when I became flustered about losing mine due to diesel bug.   ;-)
ZaphodsPlanet
ZaphodsPlanet - 3 years ago
Did he check the weather before leaving?  Just curious.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Not only did I check 6 or 7 wx sources Zaphod, but also subscribed to a routing service.   The combination of all of that led me to sail about 120 NM out of my way to try to keep the rapidly backing wind at a comfortable apparent wind angle.   The strategy almost paid off.  I didn't really hit the gale force winds until only 35 NM from my destination --- in other words, 5-6 hours from port after a 10 day passage.   The wx forecast was actually not bad ---- I was expecting winds on the final day to be in the 20-30 knot range, and they were actually in the 25-35 range with gusts to 40+.  Next year I will have an on-board wx reception capability to manage the changing circumstances better.   Regards
Sean Cahillane
Sean Cahillane - 3 years ago
nice video TY. But...you left your binoculars on the table in THAT weather for a nap?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Ha!  They survived!   They have fallen off that table before due to a wave/ wind heeling combination.   Not a good idea to leave them out in rough wx.    I was quite tired, so not thinking clearly.  ;-)   Thanks for watching Sean.
Robert Orzech
Robert Orzech - 3 years ago
That's the reason I'm not a motor sailor and use a fuel polisher also. I hate to say it , but you were just asking for this engine failure to happen.Fair winds. Great videos ! You never did say what you hit in the mud in that marina. Sounded to me like you hit an  old wwII sunken wreck.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
The Harbor Master never did tell me what it was despite a couple of nudges from me.    There were some politics involved as the Harbor Master is responsible for running the marina, but another agency is responsible for the depth......   I decided that I shouldn't insist too much (as a foreigner).   Thanks for watching.
D WS
D WS - 3 years ago
great display of seamanship, patience and stamina ..kudos Amigo
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks D.  I'm not sure how great my seamanship was as I still ask myself, "Perhaps it would have been better to heave to, or run downwind...?"   Anyway, all is well that ends well.  I learned a lot, and my boat (and I) will be better prepared for the next gale.   Thanks for watching.
Axnfell
Axnfell - 3 years ago
Done that trip a few times myself, also solo, thankfully always had good runs, mind you I love rough weather, great videos
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Axnfell.   My return from the Azores was delightfully uneventful.   :-)  I guess the key to success is to hope for good weather, but be prepared for bad wx by having the right sail plan (staysail/storm jib) and third reef, and understand the tradeoffs with the various storm strategies (hove to, running downwind or forereaching).   Gales will always be a bit uncomfortable, but they don't have to be dangerous.  Best to you.
FiddleStick's bessette
FiddleStick's bessette - 3 years ago
so much noise..? I never heard that kind of noise before,everything's rattle'ing.sound's like the whole boat is coming apart..Your Pretty Brave,Saylor Man.If That Was Me,Id Run Aground,And jump Off that contraption,and RUN Like Hell,And Go In The Nearest Bar,and Ask for A Bottle Of something Strong,lol
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Even with the noise, you have no problem sleeping due to the high state of fatigue caused by the constant movement of the boat (and your need to brace against that movement).  As soon as I close my eyes, I'm asleep.  :-)
FiddleStick's bessette
FiddleStick's bessette - 3 years ago
What is Tacked.??-Also,i knew a boater that connected 2 different fuel line's,with filters,so,if anything happened to one,he turned it off and opened the other line.ya know.?? He had a few trick's for when something went wrong,he was ready,the boat was ready.Cause sometime's,you could get it bug trouble if the motor quits..nice video.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Fiddle Stick.  To 'tack' in a sailboat is to turn the nose of the boat across the wind.   (You can't sail directly into the wind.  The closest you can get is about 30 degrees off the wind.)  To 'tack' is to cross the wind to the other side.  Because of the math of the wind (and 'apparent' wind caused by the motion of the sailboat), tacking actually requires a 90 degree turn (and not just 60 degrees).  Yes, I am familiar with the concept of having twin fuel filters so that you can quickly switch from one to another if the filter gets blocked.   Unfortunately, lines can get blocked elsewhere than just the filter (as happened to me).    That can make for some unwanted excitement!   Thanks for watching.
lonefoxilluminus
lonefoxilluminus - 3 years ago
Hi, as you were moving away from your intended destination, was there a reason you kept sailing rather than heaving to ?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Glenn. I'm relatively new at this as well, but having great fun learning as I go. :-)
lonefoxilluminus
lonefoxilluminus - 3 years ago
Thanks Patrick,
I bought a 40ft Saltram Saga last year, and am getting as much information as I can to build my understanding.
Your reply and video are very helpful.
Glenn
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
You have hit the key issue Lonefox.  In a storm you have a few options: run downwind with the storm to relieve stress on the rigging (but it keeps you in the storm longer, and you may have to beat 150+ NM back to your destination); You can heave to.  I struggle getting my boat to heave to like in the text books, and in this case, the seas were very confused with deep swell from the North, and wind waves from the SW.   While trying to tweak a hove to position, I took two small waves over the side and stern, so dropped this half-hearted effort; You can forereach into the storm with deeply reefed sails -- advantage you retain control of the boat, and head safely into seas and wind, but with more stress to rigging.  This is a favorite technique of sailing legend Kretchsmer -- and what I elected to do, even though it took me further away from destination; or you can drift while lying ahull (just drift with no sails).  Some people swear by this, but I don't like being sideways to wind and waves -- not for me.   Should I have persisted and remained hove to?  Maybe, but doing so is not without chaffing consequences either.   I now have a better sail plan for my boat (storm sail, and am installing an inner forestay).   I may make a different decision the next time.   Thanks for asking.
Observer 21
Observer 21 - 3 years ago
Patrick,
You shouldn't cross anything serious without a storm jib or trysail.
Rolling genoas become bags if rolled more than 15-20% (unless with well designed luff padding) and this pulls your boat down. Your sails were flapping too much, if you can't flatten them easy off the course a bit.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Too kind Michael.  Much appreciated (but if I gave the impression it was life threatening, then I was clearly over-acting)!    Many thanks for watching.
Michael Noonan
Michael Noonan - 3 years ago
As  a land lubber I am seriously impressed with your calm and informative videos under  pressure in what appears to me potential life threatening situations !!. I have watched some sailing videos of families, groups and couples undertaking blue water sailing  . . . .  but you are the most impressive. I wish you the very best in your future adventures .  michael
Observer 21
Observer 21 - 3 years ago
Tnx for the discussion. Fair winds and good luck.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks for sharing your experience Observer.  I suppose every boat owner will have unique circumstances and will have to decide what is best for them (given the trade-offs and alternatives).  My personal take-away was that I felt confident that if I turned downwind and attached the bag and ran the sheets, and then turned back upwind to deploy it --- it would be manageable (for the one time per year I would have to use a storm jib to 'get me home').    That said, I have made arrangements for a quote for installing an inner forestay next week.  However, even if I go that way, it is not for a storm jib that I do it; it will be so I can have a smaller and flatter sail (type solent) to be able to head upwind without flailing sails and overstressed rigging.   A reefed genoa is just never going to be very satisfactory.   I'll probably film the installation of the inner stay if I have it done this winter.   Thanks again for contributing.
Observer 21
Observer 21 - 3 years ago
Patrick Laine

I'm sorry to disappoint you, but the wrap around jib is a pig to handle on a bucking fordeck, the wet bag was very slippery and heavy, even with my good strength and experience I couldn't set it, gave up. Single handed or two up, forget it. I swear by the baby stay and hank-on storm jib.
Btw, I'd u had proper luff padding u shouldn't have had the jib flapping, with car forward and sheet tight as hell it would go in 30-40 kits no problem, been there done it (raced for decades).
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
You are absolutely right , Observer.   That said, my genoa is made of hydranet radial, with a foam luff.  (For non-sailors, that is very heavy duty material, and the foam allows the sail to maintain a better shape when partially reefed.)  However, as Observer comments, gusts to 47 kts was clearly too much for even the deeply reefed genoa.  For that reason, I have since purchased a 'wrap-around' storm jib (Storm Bag, to get me home from a difficult situation).   I am less convinced, however, about the need for a trysail.   (For non-sailors, it is a small sail that replaces the mainsail in a serious storm.)    I don't have a second track in the mast to hoist it, and sliding out the 'sliders/chariots' of my mainsail in storm conditions, and then feeding in the trysail luff, is probably something I would never try to do solo.    I think a deep third reef is probably all I would ever need -- going to bare poles after.   If I were to sail extensively in the Southern Ocean, a trysail would be a must-have, but is probably a nice-to-have where I envisage sailing.   Thanks for the good comment.
colin smith
colin smith - 3 years ago
Great videos Mr Laine,I think the fact that your sailing solo has me fascinated. I do not sail myself but your great description keeps me interested from cold Chicago. Ive noticed a Navy shirt a couple times did you serve sir? You might have mentioned this already I havent been through all your videos. Good day sir and smooth sailing.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks for the kind words Colin.  Yes -- I served in the Navy, but as a fighter pilot, not a ship driver.    You can tell --- this boat driving is a bit challenging for me.  ;-)
Lex VD Linden
Lex VD Linden - 3 years ago
Enjoyed the video! And the diaper thing to absorb liquids.. genius!
I'm doing a education to become a captain on tall ships this winter and I'm going to tell my engineer teacher about this! Never heard of this before but truly genius!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks much Lex.  Diapers are much cheaper than those oil absorbing materials they sell in the marine stores.   They work just fine.    Good luck on your Tall Ship training.  I have never been on one, but it is on my list......   Thanks for watching.
Aimee R
Aimee R - 3 years ago
My husband and I love your channel. It's been so informative and refreshing.  I personally found this episode really encouraging, we are setting sail this spring and to watch you so calm and applying your knowledge in a difficult situation was so great to see. I hope I can stay this calm if something like this ever occurs! Thank you and please keep them coming!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
How very kind of you Aimée.    I'm delighted you found something of interest in these videos.   Here's wishing you fair winds next Spring.    :-)
kevin hoffman
kevin hoffman - 3 years ago
that was great
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Kevin.  It was an adventure and a half!
ReZipped
ReZipped - 3 years ago
Yikes. That storm made me pucker.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
It had its moments for sure.   I really did not want to go forward to the mast to put in the third reef, but could not stand the thought of having too much canvas out as night was approaching.   I finally did my Nike thing: "Just Do It", and it all went very well.  :-)    That said, 35-40 kts is a long way from being a life threatening hurricane --- it was a bit uncomfortable, but not really dangerous.    The video is perhaps a bit more dramatic than conditions really merited.  Thanks for watching ReZipped.
Curtis Prince Music
Curtis Prince Music - 3 years ago
Never go to windward of an island! Glad you made it :)
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
It was an experience filled with challenges Curtis.  Great fun.  Many thanks for watching.
Varvitski
Varvitski - 3 years ago
Wonderful! I actually applauded when I saw you had painted her name on the pier. Bravo!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thank you so much Varvitski.   It was a special moment for me.   Glad you enjoyed it.
championskyeterrier
championskyeterrier - 3 years ago
Great video and channel. Patrick did you consider going hove to to ride out the gale, maybe less strain on the rigging and sails?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I was hove to very briefly Champion.  The problem was that the wind was backing from NW to South very rapidly which caused the wind and waves to completely out of alignment.  This exposed my rear quarter to the seas in a very uncomfortable manner.  (I even took two small waves over the stern very rapidly.)  I quickly decided to forereach instead, which was very comfortable as you can see in the video.  You are right though, heaving to would have been much less stressful on the rigging.  Thanks for the great question.
Dan Courtney
Dan Courtney - 3 years ago
Really like your videos... very helpful. Just my two cents from limited ocean experience. You can never have too much sea room, so heading away from land in the storm is smart. Your sails and rig were really taking a pounding. Once you've done everything you can with reducing sail and sail trim, then the next thing is controlling your heading. It looks like your autopilot isn't reacting fast enough, or your boat doesn't have the speed to keep from rounding up and flogging the sails. Hand steering is an option, but single handed you can only do that for so long. The only other reasonable option in your situation may have been to hove to. Not sure if that was considered.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Your solution is clearly the best one Dan, and I will do exactly that before going on another major passage.    Good luck on the refit.
Dan Courtney
Dan Courtney - 3 years ago
That makes perfect sense... thanks for clarifying. I'm currently re-fitting a Reliance 44 ketch that has a removable forestay that attaches to a wimpy padeye on the deck. I was pretty sure I wanted to beef up that attachment point so I could fly a stay sail in just the kind of conditions you encountered. Watching your video has convinced me that's a good idea. Thanks again.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks for the kind remarks Dan.  You hit the key issue directly on the head.  I saw three options: run downwind with the storm; heave to; or forereach into the storm at 1-4 knots.   I ruled our running downwind very early because (error on my part) I did not have a current wx forecast, and running keeps you in the storm even longer (and then you have to beat your way back).  It does really take a lot of pressure off the rig though.   I actually briefly tried to heave to, but the wind was backing very rapidly, from NW to S, and waves and wind were not at all aligned.   I felt very uncomfortable putting my stern quarter to the waves (and two small waves actually pooped into the cockpit).   After 15 minutes, I elected to forereach into the storm (a favorite tactic of legend John Kretschmer), and continued to do so for a full 24 hours, before turning back to Horta.    Yes, as you point out, the sails took a bit of a beating.    The problem here is that a partially furled genoa is a very poor solution for a gale.   I have learned my lesson, and before my next major crossing will get an inner forestay on which I can hoist a staysail or storm sail.   In the meantime, I have purchased a 'get me home' Storm Bag sail which wraps around the furled genoa.  (See Episode 19.)   I did not have the feeling during the storm that the autopilot was not doing its job.  I actually liked the mild rounding up and then falling off a bit, and when I balanced the sails a bit better, the rounding up-stopped.    At the time it did not seem extreme or dangerous to the equipment......but maybe I was not viewing events with as clear a mind as I should have.   I was a little slow putting in the third reef, but that was because it required me to go to the mast, and I was not at all eager to do that (though the maneuver went very well when I finally did).  Many thanks for the excellent comment.
spencer marshall
spencer marshall - 3 years ago
I can't tell you how many times I have heard of water contamination of fuel during adverse conditions courtesy of leaking fill cap o-rings. Good call on staying from aft quartering seas in those conditions. You issue in the end sounded more like that sea snot fuel growth though. Everything on the bottom of a tank gets turned up and set loose in heavy conditions. The leaches of your sails were taking quite a beating there.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Yeah Spencer -- it turned out to be a bacteria blockage in a valve upstream of the engine (see Episode 13 if you are interested in more details).   I was really confused when I popped open the filter/separator, and it was nearly pristine, with the exception of a bit of water in the bottom.   If the engine failure had really been due to water contamination, I imagine the engine would have done quite a bit of surging before shutting down.   My initial thoughts of bacteria blockage were correct, but I just didn't think it all of the way through.   I probably would have eventually thought to check the rest of the line for blockage if I had been hundreds of miles from land.   As it was, fatigue, combined with only being 30 miles from my destination in a bit of a blow, did not favor in-depth analysis.   I decided early-on just to ride out the storm, and then sail the few miles remaining to the mouth of the marina.   It all worked out in the end.

50. comment for Ep. 12: Sailing Single-handed to Azores: Gale Arrival with an Engine Failure

Anders Jakobsen
Anders Jakobsen - 3 years ago
This is a REALLY great episode from you Patrick.
Don`t know how i could have missed it.
It has a lot of good seiling and seamanship.
Love it ;-)
Anders Jakobsen
Anders Jakobsen - 3 years ago
This is a testosterone episode ;-) But it shows the reality of sailing. It is NOT all bikini
boobs and nice ass ;-)

I hope you see a bikini on board one day...
Of cam at least.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Anders.   This is the one with a bit of excitement.   :-)   No bikinis though.....
Mark Claydon
Mark Claydon - 3 years ago
Forgive me for not giving you so many thumbs up, (maybe I'll go back and do that) I just kept on going to each next video. Loved it and happily still more to go, I'll try to remember to remember to show my considerable appreciation. Thanks man was like being there with you, one of the very best I've seen, makes my lake sailing seem a bit tame
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks for the words of support Mark.  Much appreciated.   Hey, I enjoy lake sailing too.  I did a fair amount on Lac Leman (Lake Geneva) when I worked in Geneva, Switzerland, and I loved it.   And yes, while we usually don't get crashing waves there, on occasions, the wind really rushes through the mountains making it quite sporty as well.  Many experienced sailors get caught-out there.   Thanks for watching.
Mark
Mark - 3 years ago
Man I sure enjoyed watching your journey. Had me on the edge of my seat. Sailing is on my bucket list. Nice job Captain.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Terrific Mark.  Go find a sailing club with a professional instructor to get you started.  Warning though....it s addictive.   :-)
Web Browne
Web Browne - 3 years ago
Gas in the fuel tank. I am sure that was miss spoke statement, but for a new  sailor to hear this could cause a problem.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Ha! Yes WB, I was speaking 'generically'. It really was diesel, or gasoil as the French say. I wanted to keep the tank near full so as to minimize the agitation of the sediment on the bottom. Good catch.
Peter McLachlan
Peter McLachlan - 3 years ago
Very informative Patrick. You really show the value of staying calm in any situation. Probably your forces training. I cannot believe how little time you seem to spend looking forward. The AIS is good for anything that has AIS ahead, but what if it’s another sailboat or floating container? I always watch forward. Same with single handing and sleeping. That would make me so nervous I would never sleep! Looking forward to the next episodes.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Peter. I do look forward quite often, but obviously not all the time. In fact, when I am in coastal waters, I almost always leave the spray hood down so that my view forward is unimpeded, and my favorite cockpit position is sitting just forward of the helm, looking forward. ;-) As you suggest, lookout is one of the major challenges of solo sailing. Unfortunately, there is no perfect solution. Appreciate the good comment.
Geoff Wright
Geoff Wright - 3 years ago
This has got to be the best of your videos yet, thank you. So glad you stood off the Islands rather than make the mistake of so many by trying to reach a 'safe' harbo(u)r!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
In honesty Geoff, I did briefly consider heading in to port, but just thought I was safer out at sea until things calmed down.   I agree, trying to head to safety prematurely can be a formula for disaster.  Many thanks for watching.
gary naldrett
gary naldrett - 3 years ago
I agree- some of the best video I've seen on sailing. narration and explanation very helpful. thank you.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Very kind Gary.  I'm delighted you got something out of them.
dawntreader70
dawntreader70 - 3 years ago
well done sir
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
It was great fun, and a bit of a challenge too.  Many thanks.
MAL L
MAL L - 3 years ago
Hi Patrick, awesome trip, ive been in rough seas but never solo although i do plan to do some solo trips in my yacht I've just acquired. With the fuel issue treating bugs and or water in fuel the best thing ive found is F10 we use it at work on commercial boats ive literally treated millions of liters of diesel with the stuff over the years, i just put some in my yachts tank as it had been sitting for years rarely used and no telling the condition of the fuel and im about to undertake a delivery voyage in 2 weeks (with crew). Don't know if you can get it in your part of the world (im in Australia) but here's the link for you to check out.
Cheers Mal,
Marine Engineer.
http://www.ictproducts.com/f-10-fuel-treatment.html
MAL L
MAL L - 3 years ago
no worries, if it was something i could post i'd send you a small bottle of it, it will last you ages as the mix ratio is 4000:1
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks for the tip Mal.  I just sent an email to them to see if F-10 is available in France.    They say it kills the bugs, and is hygroscopic, so eliminates the water as well.   Sounds like a good marine product, well-tested in marine applications.  Thanks and best regards Down Under
Chris Perez
Chris Perez - 3 years ago
i like your episodes. I have no blue water experience.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Cheers Chris.   It is always a difficult decision to think, "Am I ready to transition from day, coastal sailing to blue water passage sailing."    I eased into blue water sailing slowly (with quite a number of 250 mile trips solo) before I set out on the 1100 NM trip to the Azores.   I still make many mistakes, but my confidence is growing that I can handle more difficult situations with each sortie.    Thanks for watching.
Tino G - Sailing
Tino G - Sailing - 3 years ago
Fun to see the rodkicker in action, holding the boom all by itself.  A good but also scary video to watch.  If your gas spring breaks in the rodkicker you can get a new one in Denmark for 64 Euro at www.fjedre.dk
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Tino.  I do rig a preventer (actually a brake from Wichard), to absorb some of the shock.   My topping lift shackle came apart half way through the storm and the shackle went straight to the top of the mast (of course).   Thanks for watching.  Please do watch Ep 13 so you can see I have the same (defective) fuel shut-off valve as you have on your boat.  I have since changed mine.
Mary Gray
Mary Gray - 3 years ago
Love your videos. You give an honest portrayal of the reality of blue water sailing. Really like your videos best of all those on YouTube. Best of luck and hope you do more videos in the future.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
You made my day Mary.  Thanks.
Thomas Gregory
Thomas Gregory - 3 years ago
Hi Patrick, thank you for posting your videos I've had a bit of a binge watch today. I've got a real interest in solo sailing and preping my boat (Albin Ballad) for the Jester Challenge. Sailing to Horta and beyond is on my bucket list and it's great to follow your trip.

Looking forward to seeing your future adventures.

Tom
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks.  I subscribed to his channel a couple of weeks ago.  :-)
Thomas Gregory
Thomas Gregory - 3 years ago
Yes great bunch of guys, Andy Lane is in France, ex forces Jester sailor, you should check him out.

Keep up the good work, look forward to seeing more!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Hello Tom.  I love the spirit of the Jester Challenge participants.  My kind of sailors.  Unfortunately, at 40 feet, my boat is too long for their criteria, so I can't participate in their adventures.   Good luck on realizing your Azores bucket list item.  It's a great adventure.
Stephen Lediard
Stephen Lediard - 3 years ago
Really informative and a very cool sailor.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Stephen. Very nice of you to say so.
rlj pan
rlj pan - 3 years ago
Again, thanks.
brokerhc
brokerhc - 3 years ago
Your saga reminded me of a trip I made from St Barth to Virgin Gorda during the eighties on a gale that lasted from 8:00 PM to 6: 00 AM. We were in an Irwin 40 without any roller furling on the Genoa. We started the trip with a 2 reef main and a poled 125 Genoa with a gentle downwind ride and 7 people on board with only me and a 15 yr. old teen with sailing experience. At around 9:00 the teen had to go forward and change the Genoa to a storm sail, something he did in a very professional way. I spent the whole night in the helm thanks to my foul weather gear and lots of hot chocolate and Spanish Galician soup brought to me by one of the female members of the crew that was not seasick. I was so happy when around 5:00 AM I spotted Peter Island on the Northwest, an indication that I was about 30 miles South of my intended route. No radar, no GPS, no laptops and no satellite radios in those times, just a Radio direction finder, a Compass and lots of pencil estimates in printed charts. Keep up the excellent work with your videos.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Wow Broker, that sounds like a nightmare scenario, especially with so many non-sailors aboard.    Sounds like you managed a difficult situation with extreme professionalism.   Bravo.   One of my greatest concerns, as a solo sailor, is loss of the autopilot in difficult waters, or during a storm.   I have a Plan B and a Plan C, but I really don't look forward to staying at the helm for 24 hours.   The Lewmar autopilot I have on my Bavaria has not yet let me down.   Knock on wood.    Thanks for commenting.
Robert Kowalski
Robert Kowalski - 3 years ago
Pat I'm wondering with no disrespect but do you have much open water experience? Things like broken battens and fuel filters aren't the kind of thing that should be happening they should have been taken care at port.
Long hauling pinching up on an island is "always" the wrong move and also the slowest and roughest. Think in terms of days not hours. In "okay I can tac now sail a more comfortable 45 to 50 degrees clear the island in clear air (remember there is a wind shadow 9 times projected out the height of the land mass). Once clear tack back and sail deeper lets say 55 to 60 degrees. You'll be flatter faster more comfy and more than make up for the perceived lost time.  

bob Sitting in Massachusetts waiting for his window...
Robert Kowalski
Robert Kowalski - 3 years ago
A big part of solo sailing is boat condition and prep, did your sailmaker know what kind of sailing you were going to do? Did you have a sailmaker go over your sails before going on passage?The thing about your fuel is such a common and preventable thing and probably why I asked about experience.The best way to never have to worry about that I have found is keep your tanks toped off never let them go below half for more than a week(passage doesn't count). Every Marina sells a biocide for the bio problem, get and use. You might want to look into having your tanks scrubbed especially if you had that problem and your tank was over .75 full.

Weather the best advice I ever got on weather was to look at least 5 different reports daily and believe none...Do you know about Grib do you know how to read them? If not learn, let them tell you when to go not the calendar and especially not your watch! Heave to, hove to, like the spelling it's all a choice one of which your personal comfort level should be the judge, given from a guy that people say gets this odd sorta grin when the wind is over 30knts.

Rhumb lines? I've heard of um their imaginary aren't they?
Pat, my boat's name is Courage a j/32 I'm New England now heading to the Caribbean as soon as I get a window stop by if we share an anchorage we can break bread share lies ask me to tell you my Pardey story its a hoot. Hope some of this helped good luck.
bob
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Great contribution Robert.    Not sure I fully understand the batten and blocked fuel line comments, but the pinching remark touches home.   In a modest degree of self-defense, I did not plan this passage on a rhumb line, direct path A to B.  For the very reasons you mention (keeping the boat flatter, more comfortable, and faster), I added almost 200 NM (that's almost 40 extra hours of sailing) to a 900 NM trip so that I could keep the AWA at a comfortable and fast 50-60 degrees for that last 150 NM.   The strategy almost paid off ---- that last 10-15 degrees of backing of the wind occurred when I was only about 35 NM from destination.   I did try to pinch up for a couple of hours, but saw the futility of it, and just tacked.  Sorry if I made it look "dramatic" on film.  Fatigue after a long night in rain.  More important though is the issue of how much experience does an intermediate level sailor need before striking out on a major passage solo.  I put a great deal of thought into that.  (I had put about 3000 NM on the boat in the year prior to the Azores trip, but the longest ones had been several passages of only 250 NM.)  How does one objectively judge if one is ready?   I had done everything I could think of to prepare the boat.  I had taken lessons with pros.  I  read  all of the books from the legends (Kretschmer, Pardey, etc.), and spent too much time on YouTube!  Just as in flying airplanes, there comes a time when you have to say, yes, I could go up for another lesson, but I feel ready to solo now.   I went.   The biggest issue I worried about was whether during the storm I should have hove to, or even run downwind with the storm, rather than forereach into it.    There are trade-offs with each of those options, and I wondered (and still wonder) that if I had had more experience, would I have handled that aspect differently?   Best regards
Wilf Williams
Wilf Williams - 3 years ago
Patrick, what a wonderful trip , I'm lying in bed with flu and binge watched the whole series . Many thanks for taking the time to record and edit all that. kind regards Wilf
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Wilf.   I'm delighted my videos provided a bit of recovery therapy --- though I suspect they just helped you get to sleep.   :-)    Best regards
MeRioDeLaPlata
MeRioDeLaPlata - 3 years ago
I came across one of your videos and I was trapped. I watched them all in two days. You are very didactic and clear in your explanations. I hope one day to extend my sailing horizon beyond the Lake Ontario. Thank you for sharing your experience.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Very kind of you MRDLP.   I have visited the Great Lakes many times, but never sailed them.   Beautiful places, and I hope to visit them properly someday by sailing them.   Best regards
Sailing Taranto
Sailing Taranto - 3 years ago
Go Isabella! Go Patrick! Priceless experience to have shared. Cheers
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
You picked up the 'priceless' note.  Terrific!   :-)   It was a very special moment for me.    Thanks for watching Taranto.  Fair winds.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
With much pleasure Leif.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks for the very kind comment Leif.   Solo sailing is a special experience --- but, even if you don't sail solo, this experience in your training gives you confidence to go out to sea even when you are with others with little experience.
Silky Jones
Silky Jones - 3 years ago
I have seen many sailing vids, but this journey with you has been the best. Younare a. Interesting story teller and made me feel I was there too. I hope you continue making videos for a long time. I had considered sailing but recently had a heart attack so sailing is out for now, I'll just have to live your adventures.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Here's wishing you a speedy recovery Silky so that you can get out on the water.    Thank you for the very kind comment.
Jean Robillard
Jean Robillard - 3 years ago
Hi Patrick! Yours is certainly one of the best sailing channels on YT. Only because it is about sailing and nothing other. And solo sailing, which is what I do myself. This video is, as you wrote on the very last frame: priceless. To be able to keep calm under these conditions is the lesson given here. The analysis of what is going on is the process of rationaly deciding what to do and what to expect. But this has to be done with calm. And a smile. And yours is contagious! Cheers and many thanks!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
You are too kind Jean.  I'm delighted you enjoyed the trip.   It was a real adventure for me too, as I am far from an expert at solo sailing.     Still much to learn.  Here's wishing you fair winds for the future.
Terrence Bradley
Terrence Bradley - 3 years ago
Hello Patrick! I was bashing about on youtube and blundered onto your videos and was instantly riveted much to the chagrin of my wife who was wanting me to help her move some furniture. I sail in the Pacific Northwest and have found much useful information in your videos. You give us a frame of reference for those times when we are no longer armchair sailing!
Terrence Bradley
Terrence Bradley - 3 years ago
Bobby Sue many times. Have also been up to the Gulf Islands. You should stop by Oak Harbor and also La Connor on your way to Annacortes. I have sailed the area for the past eight years.
Bobby Sue
Bobby Sue - 3 years ago
Terrence Bradley nice! We're on a Catalina 34, have you made a trip to the San Juans yet?
Terrence Bradley
Terrence Bradley - 3 years ago
I single hand a Catalina 27 and also sail on my son's Hunter 34. Boats are sailed out of Oak Harbor On Whidbey Island. I spend from April or May until September out there and the rest of the year I am on the headwaters of Pig Eye Creek in Ohio.
Bobby Sue
Bobby Sue - 3 years ago
Terrence Bradley what kind of boat are you on? We're planning a trip from Olympia to Anacortes next April.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Ha!   Very kind Terrence.   You live in a beautiful area to sail --- and I imagine have learned to deal with some fairly harsh weather too.   Fair winds my friend.
Daniel Jackson
Daniel Jackson - 3 years ago
I am so impressed by your composure, I guess you've seen all sorts during your career as a pilot, so a few crazy waves, no engine, and a bad weather doesn't phase you, I laughed when you said im going to take a nap... great job looking after your boat, and her looking after you. I've been looking at an upgrade to a Bavaria sailboat so this was amazing to watch.thank you for sharing this with us, can't wait for the next installment of episodes. Best wishes, dan.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks for the thoughtful message Daniel.   I really like my Bavaria (though my French-biased neighbors give me a lot of stick for it).  :-)    Best wishes to you on your upgrade.
Philip Haydon
Philip Haydon - 3 years ago
Excellent job. I am sure standing on that dock was pretty emotional.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Although a former fighter pilot would never admit to emotion......between us, I've heard it said that some people experience a real sense of accomplishment standing on that dock.   :-)      Thanks for watching Philip.
Grandpa the Grey
Grandpa the Grey - 3 years ago
In the early 70's, I was stationed at Lajes Field on Terceira Island in the Azores. Lived off base in Praia de Victoria. Family & I loved it so much I extended my enlistment just to stay long as possible...3 years. Been to all nine islands either fishing, diving, drinking, or all three. The Island of Faial, where the City of Horta is located, is one of my favorite places on the planet. Spent hours walking the marina looking at all the vessel signets painted there..... then up to Pete's Cafe for Sagres cerveza or espresso. Enjoying the hell out of your videos Skipper.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks so much Mr Grey.   What is a bit sad is that the vast majority of people who sail to Horta, leave immediately after a beer at Peter's.   As you say, they are a lovely group of islands.  I went on to Punta Delgada where I stayed another week.  I regret not having made the time to island hop to others.   Maybe next time.   Thanks for watching.
Peter Paris, Germany
Peter Paris, Germany - 3 years ago
This is a very good example that sailcloth fabrics of a "normal" mainsail and of a roller reef genoa are neither strong enough nor made for this kind of conditions. This video is showing that the sailor should have used a trysail (very strong made, 50 percent mainsail) and a storm-jib. It is hard to believe, that a storm-jib was carried on board but not hoisted. It all points out that this sailor from US wants to teach something to us but having to less experience to do well. For me it seems that he is surprised by the consequences and looking at this helpless person makes me feel that the skipper was not being prepared well enough for such kind of weather. Please learn something about storm tactics and then sail out on the oceans and not the other way round! But thumbs up for the courage. For good advices take a look at Skip Novak's storm sailing techniques on Youtube.
Benjamin Logsdon
Benjamin Logsdon - 3 years ago
I appreciate you sharing your experiences and your willingness to answer questions honestly. One day I hope to be making solo off shore passages. In the meantime, I’ll just continue to live vicariously through your videos. Nice work!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Well, reducing flogging is clearly an objective all the time.   You can do this 'mechanically' by easing the sail, putting in a reef (or hoisting smaller sails), and/or pulling on the leech tensioner.  (I learned during this passage that there is a leech tensioning point at each reef point, not just at the clew!)  You can also ease the stress 'tactically' by your choice of maneuver: hove to, running downwind, forereaching or even lying a-hull (drifting with no sails).  Each has its pros and cons.   For example, heaving-to is great, but if the wind and seas are not aligned, you may end up taking waves over the side or stern.   Running downwind is great, but it keeps in in the storm longer, and then you may have to beat up against the wind to get back to your destination.  I don't think there is a magic formula.  I did note in my gale, that although I suffered a torn leech while forereaching, many other boats that had been coming in from the southwest (running with the storm) also suffered sail damage, a few even completely exploded their sails doing so.  Good question Benjamin.
Benjamin Logsdon
Benjamin Logsdon - 3 years ago
It appears that a flogging sail will destroy itself in short order. Do you think if you you reduced the flogging it would have prevented the failure?
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Peter.  My genoa has the UV protection strip so the friction damage issue is less of a problem when I use the Storm Bag.   I have used a removable inner stay (normally attached to a turnbuckle on the side) on another boat and found it extremely easy to use.   I really liked it.  However, 90% of my sailing is solo, so I am always concerned about my ability to hank on a sail alone on the foredeck in 35 kts of wind.   That is what attracted me to the Storm Bag.   You clip it on and then deploy it from the cockpit.   The downside is that you can only use it once.   It can't really be repacked on the boat.   Regarding a trysail, I have essentially ruled this out on my boat.   I much prefer a very deep third reef.   There is no second rail in my mast for the trysail, so I would have to pull out all of the mainsail "chariots" and then slide in the trysail luff sliders.   Again, I can't imagine doing that alone in 35+ kts.   I think I'll stick with the third reef.   If I ever go around the Horn, I may rethink this, but for my current cruising plans, I'm probably OK.    Many thanks for your contribution and expertise.   I don't disagree with you --- I just have a different point of view (solo sailor on a 40' boat).   Best regards
Peter Paris, Germany
Peter Paris, Germany - 3 years ago
In another video you are introducing a storm jib which got to be wrapped around the furling genoa when it is furled in. That's the reason why I assumed that you'd carried this sail with you on board with the rest of your gear. By the way you can buy a very similar sail here in Germany at Lee Sails, too. But there are some points why this sail can't be recommended, If you wrap it over the coiled fabric of the genoa, hoist it and use it whlie tacking, because it causes the risk of dammaging the zig-zag seams of the genoa if the genoa isn't outfitted with a stripe of cloth at the leech (against UV). I was working as a sailmaker, I know what I am talking about. In one of the following videos you are introducing this storm sail and you mentioned the inner forestay which is the better solution in my eyes. And it is a bit disappointing that your choice didn't fall on this rigging idea. To mount an inner forestay means that one is forced to choose a bit more material and some additional work to prepare the hoist of the jib, because you need to remove it while sailing with the genoa and put it back for using the storm jib. On cruising yachts you'll often find it in a parking position close to the mast and it will get mounted in position on the foredeck when it's necessary to. But this offers the chance, to use a storm sail (with hanks) which has got the performance of a real sail, because it's luff is aerodynamic and good for sailing high to the wind. So choosing this foresail version would have meant to be prepared for the worst. Then again the trysail: Take a look at the video "Get ready to cross oceans" (Lyn and Larry Pardey) which is a bit old-fashioned but still contains good advices about storm sailing and b.t.w. trysails. My boat is a bit smaller than yours. I need to put the lugs (sliders) out of the rail which takes 3 or 5 minutes of time. Than I need to put the sliders of the new sail back into the rail. To hoist the sail means to tack into the wind and this is the onliest dangerous thing to do in rough waves. Of course you are forced to use the motor if you are singlehanded. My boat is only 27 foot long but carries gear which is suitable for sailing in strong winds. Most sailors trust the furling genoas with the profiled forestay. I think this is one of the most reasons why storm-jibs are not in use when there is a serious need to use them. I even haven't got a furling system on my boat. And I don't plan to change that. In my eyes the removable inner forestay is a must when your boat carries a furling genoa like yours do. Fair winds and godspeed!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
You make some legitimate points Peter that I can't argue with.   However, you can keep taking lessons forever.  There comes a time when you have to strike out on your own.....  Was I properly prepared?   Perhaps not, but I don't think the solution was technical (different sails, etc.).   The real choice was should I have hove to rather than forereached, or even turned and run downwind for 24 hours.   Just for the record, I did not have a storm jib on board, because there was no way to hoist it (no removable or fixed inner forestay).   My genoa is made of very heavy triradial hydranet ---- so very unlikely to fail.   Finally, to hoist a trysail requires some special set-up as well (extra rail on the mast for example).   I have enormous respect for Skip Novac and have watched his excellent videos.  That said, they seem more suited for people sailing in the violent Southern Ocean in boats with crews of 6 or 7 people.   Your underlying question is a good one though.   When is one really ready to take on a major sailing challenge?   Perhaps I went before my experience level was sufficient, but I don't know how to measure 'sufficient' objectively.  There comes a time when you just have to say, I'm ready to take on this challenge.   Thanks again for commenting.   Fair winds to you.
SAIL CANCER
SAIL CANCER - 3 years ago
just found your channel, It is a breath of fresh air the have a SAILING CHANNEL not the usual biking wearing, sponsored trying to sell me stuff "a place for everything, right i am off to the off license to get a few beers and watch the rest of your videos, KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks for the very kind words Sail Cancer. Here's wishing you unlimited success in raising funds for those very important charities you are sailing for. Very best
Pandorak
Pandorak - 3 years ago
Well done Patrick. Video très intéressante.
Pandorak
Pandorak - 3 years ago
Merci Patrick! J'ai visionné aujourd'hui toutes vos vidéos sur les Açores avec beaucoup d'intérêt. Les témoignages honnêtes sont plutôt rares sur Youtube... merci pour ces films que je trouve réellement instructifs !
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Félicitations pour votre passage en solitaire aux îles Faroe. Votre video est magnifique. C'est le style que j'aime (comme celles Erik Aanderaa). Bravo. A big Like and a subscribe on your channel Pandorak. Your production quality and saiing content is terrific. I'm looking forward to future videos.
Twisted Race
Twisted Race - 3 years ago
Patrick.... I just wanted to say how enjoyable and informative your video was to watch and see all he you went through on the trip . I seem to recognize a lot of training on how you handle abnormals. I understand that you were once a Naval Aviator , but did you also have a long airline career with a major airline , and now retired?  I to have well over forty years in the air and just under thirty five years with a Major Flag Airline and about to retire and start a new endeavor of cruising my sailboat around the world . Her name is North Star a Pacific Seacraft 44 , I know that it would be great to run into you and Isabel in some beautiful little Bay and If I see you I will be sure to say Hello.. Robert
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
It's nice to hear a Heavy Metal pro admitting he has time in the Arrow.  :-)    I had great fun in it --- many great memories.    Best to you.
Twisted Race
Twisted Race - 3 years ago
Thanks for the reply , that was so very kind of you...Glad to hear that you beat that nasty cancer.. congrats.. and I do know the Piper Arrow.. I do have some ... Misspent Youth... flying the Arrow.. I always felt that it was a very fun and forgiving aircraft to fly, and I am sure that the way you set yours up was a stunning airplane to fly. Thanks for the kind words on my Pacific Seacraft... Yes a very sound Vessel.. and is quit fast and lively to sail , when ever they have been raced , they seem to win .. their class .. a very good preforming under-body design allows then to maneuver and Point very well.
And ... Hey , you should not .. Threaten me with FREE Beer and a Meal ... Pilots are known to never Pass that up.... LOL Twistedrace@gmail.com
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Robert.   When I got out of the Navy I went back to school for an MBA and then did a career in large multinationals as a boring businessman.   To retain my sanity, I bought a Piper Arrow (single engine, 4 seater, retractable, IFR certified).   I put in an instrument panel that would rival the Space Shuttle, and flew it everywhere (including across the Atlantic à la Lindberg).    Had to give up flying in 2003 after a bout with cancer...just too hard to renew my physicals.   I love the lines of your Pacific Seacraft.  A REAL cruising boat.   I'm sure you will have great fun on it.   Please stay in touch, and if you ever head East, a free beer and dinner awaits you.    pcjlaine@gmail.com
fastbikejp
fastbikejp - 3 years ago
Great Video Patrick
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks FastBike.   (Love the Triumph!)      Best
Bowman 26 - long keel boat
Bowman 26 - long keel boat - 3 years ago
Hello Patrick, been watching a few episodes and enjoying your calm and matter of fact explanations. Also learning things as I watch the clips.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Bowman. You long keel specialists are a treasured breed. Respect.
Gary McKeown
Gary McKeown - 3 years ago
WOW! Very nice, very down to earth/sea and honest. I've been watching soo many sailing channels and you/yours speaks the most clearly to me, in regards to my solo sailing present situation and likely future. (kids and wife not as excited as I about engine failure in the open sea)
You're doing a great thing and doing it well, keep it up. I like your carefree seriousness, the reality and sincerity, it truly shows through; it's refreshing from the many other channels.
I can hardly wait to be out there and meet ones, not unlike yourself.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks for the kind remark Viljar.   Thanks for watching.
Viljar Valsø
Viljar Valsø - 3 years ago
Calm and focused. I'd trust you. Fair vinds dude!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
What a generous comment you make Gary. Thanks. It's not realistic to think that all family members will share the same level of enthusiasm for sailing as we do. I hope these videos show that you can still have great fun by going solo, and that you do not need 20 years of prior experience to do so. Fair winds to you.
alex bowling
alex bowling - 3 years ago
Bravo. I admire your cool head in serious conditions and no doubt sleep deprived too. Interesting reading on the comments on storm jibs, fuel lines and your replies. For what it's worth, I couldn't help reflect on just how used to good forecasting I've become in short hop coastal cruising, and how prey to the elements you are when you don't know what's coming. Also, I've seen no wind turbine or solar panels. When the engines down, do you carry a generator to keep the auto helm functional?
alex bowling
alex bowling - 3 years ago
Patrick Laine I just binged out and watched all your other episodes and saw your fuel cell. What an elegant solution. Looking forward to watching any trips you plan for next season, so keep 'em coming!
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Alex. Agree completely about wx forecasts. For future long range passages, i will receive them via Iridium Go. Re energy for the batteries, in one of my other videos i explain the absence of solar panels and wind generator. I have installed a methanol fuel cell (brand Efoy), that automatically recharges the batteries when they fall below a preset level. Thanks for watching.
Rob Hermse
Rob Hermse - 3 years ago
Hi Patrick, just discovered your clips, when did you dock at Horta? Could not see my painting (now next to yours) so it must have been before July this year as we docked at exactly the same place: https://coriolis45.blogspot.nl/2017/07/horta.html
Will watch them all your clips with much interest!
Best regards, Rob
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Hello Rob. It is a small world indeed. I see the "Is" of Isabelle next to Coriolis' logo on the pier at Horta. I was there from 8-14 june. It was a wonderful experience. Thanks for watching, (and not painting over 'Isabelle's' logo!). Very best winds to Coriolis.
Michael Soucy
Michael Soucy - 3 years ago
Very interesting and informative video, thanks for making it.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks michael. Appreciate the support.
Simon Anderson
Simon Anderson - 3 years ago
if you ever need a shiphand ive us a shout
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Very kind Simon. You're on my list. :-)
4george315
4george315 - 3 years ago
Really enjoyed your journey Patrick, great film.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks george. Very kind of you to say so. The video thing was really a last minute decision. I'm glad that some people enjoyed them. thanks again.
Rick anonymous
Rick anonymous - 3 years ago
Amazing video Sir.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Many thanks Rick. It was a wonderful adventure for an intermediate level sailor like me. Thanks for watching.
legend343
legend343 - 3 years ago
Wow, so load, crashing and banging and you are sooo calm. I'm impressed... Well done for getting monsieur..Warrens/y Legend
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Warren.   Just as the camera does not reflect the sea state accurately, it does not reflect my level of stress accurately either.  :-)    I kept wondering if I should turn downwind to unload the rigging....... I didn't because the swell and wind were 130 degrees unaligned, but I kept wondering if I should....    I got away with it this time, but maybe not the next.   (I am buying a storm sail as I write this.)   Thanks for watching.
Barry
Barry - 3 years ago
I fitted a large capacity AC type glass bowl fuel filter/water trap, before the micro filters. Mounted to give you reasonable access and viewing, it gives an early indication of fuel contamination and is easy to clean out, whilst protecting the main micro filters. Helped me out in one scary moment.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Amen.  In fact, (not shown in the video), I thought the fuel cut-off valve was so poorly designed (tiny orifice) that I changed it when I got home to one with a much larger orifice.  That said, I agree with you that those 'edges' will be great places for goo to start accumulating.
Barry
Barry - 3 years ago
To add another complexity, I came to the conclusion that, where any hose on the in flow side. Where it is connected to the inward side of any component or metal pipe, the step that is created between the hose and the tubed connection creates a gathering environment for the diesel bug, where it builds into a slug of goo, which I ended up sucking into my mouth, happy days.The other connections further along seem then to be protected slightly. That is why your cut off tap became the first point of call for the bug. Now though, it may be the new filters. God life is hard. Why don't they just install clear pipes from new and we can see what's going on but we now have a visual concept of what's going on and where to look and that is power to our elbow. Promise not to bother you again, bonsoir.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Thanks Barry. In Ep 13 I explain what I did (strainers upstream of the microfilters). I like your idea better. I looked at putting in a dual Racors with glass bowls, but if you install it in the engine compartment, regulations require that you put in some kind of fire guard, and I also wasn't sure about mounting them above the level of the fuel tank (really the only space available in my engine compartment). All a bit complex..... Thanks for watching.
Samingo Sailing
Samingo Sailing - 4 years ago
Patrick.  How does she heave to?  I had a deeper 3rd reef in my main sail.  The woven vektron in that section of the sail is also slightly heavier than the rest of the sail.  The stay sail is an ocean premium woven + dacron.  Very heavy.  The genoa is a lighter vektron.  All manufactured for off shore blue water stuff by Kemp.  The only sail maker who did not say 'don't worry your little head we'll make your sails'.  They asked loads of questions which was nice.  With regard to rescue services .. the UK is rather blessed with the RNLI.  There are many places your alone.  Not sure which island in the Azores but someone with engine failure becalmed could do nothing to stop being taken against the cliffs by the currents.  A very experienced single hander too.
Samingo Sailing
Samingo Sailing - 3 years ago
Your right ... I've sailed with them too but the compromise is the height you can set the sail on the inner .. depends if your seriously going offshore.  Great videos.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
OK, got it James. Fixed or removable, I'm jealous of those with an inner forestay. I'd like to be in your position where it is all or nothing with the genoa, and using a staysail or storm jib when the wind is too strong for the genny. (I think I'd go with a removable one if possible, to avoid the tacking problem with the Genny under normal conditions. I sailed a boat with one once, and we could attach the inner forestay in literally 90 seconds. Cool.) Fair winds to you.
Samingo Sailing
Samingo Sailing - 3 years ago
Patrick. My boat did not have an inner forestay.  It now has a permanent fixed inner forestay.  I don't race.  I'm not in a hurry so in lighter airs I furl the genoa to tack as for the most part this is far out at sea.  There would have to be compromise with a removable inner forestay.  If I tack in a confined space I furl the genoa and use the stay sail.  It's a main driven boat anyway.  The inner forestay and the stay sail is the result of thousands of miles .... and thought.  If I reef I rarely role the genoa smaller.  I just go directly to the stay sail which also sets perfectly.  'Talisker 1' has sailed in a lot of wind under stay sail and 2 reefs in the main.  Both genoa and stay sail are on Harken furling gear.  The system is robust, proven and reliable.  My storm jib goes on the inner forestay.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
I bought a 'Storm Bag' jib at a boat show today (€1190 show price vs €1400 normal).    This is the kind that wraps around the Genny.  I hesitated a long time about buying an 'ATN Gale Sail', but I just can't picture myself up on the bow solo in 35 Kts trying to clip it on.  (The Storm Bag comes in a kit bag device that you clip on relatively easily, then deploy the sail from the cockpit.)    I realise that what I really need to do is invest in an inner forestay (removable), but the layout of my foredeck makes that all a bit complicated.  Maybe next year.    I'll try to go out in 30 Kts and film myself deploying the Storm Bag while solo.   Should be good for a chuckle.   ;-)
Samingo Sailing
Samingo Sailing - 4 years ago
Understood that.  I have a tiny SJ.  Stay sail comes down and SJ goes up.  Hope never to use it.  Its got to be v windy for the SS to come down.  The boat wrecked in the Azores In July 2004 was a Cal 34.  It was wrecked drifting, becalmed, no wind, strong currents in Pico.  He got her off and managed to sail to Horta but the boat was beyond repair.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 4 years ago
I meant to say 'in force 8 partial furling is UNacceptable'.
Samingo Sailing
Samingo Sailing - 4 years ago
No no the waves are high.  I understand film flattening the sea.  Interesting about you heaving to.  'Talisker 1' will present a starboard or port bow to the weather and just sit there.  And sea room is everything.  So easy to make the mistake of 'I could be comfortable in a few hours tucked up in port' (actually means ship wrecked and possible not living).  Much better to have loads of sea and be uncomfortable BUT alive.  Great video.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 4 years ago
Thanks James. There is a major boat show in La Rochelle at the end of the month. I am buying a storm sail (the kind that wrap around the genny). (I don't have an inner stay, so it has to be the wrap-around kind.) On a breezy Saturday afternoon, partially furling the genoa works fine. However, in Force 7 or 8, partial furling is really acceptable.

I actually did heave to for a while, but I wasn't comfortable with the aspect I was presenting to the waves. Although the seas don't looked high in the video, while I was hove to, two pooped over the stern flooding the cockpit. Made me nervous, so I decided to forereach --- which was remarkably comfortable in my boat, though the sails were quite stressed.

I hear you about being pushed into the island without an engine. I rejected an early return to the island for just that reason. When I did go in, I called them on the radio at 6 or 7 NM out to ensure they would be able to tow me (for just the reason you mention). All worked-out fine in my case. Sorry about your friend.

Very best
Samingo Sailing
Samingo Sailing - 4 years ago
Well shared.  Thank you.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 4 years ago
Cheers.   Many, many lessons learned.    Looking forward to next Spring when I learn many more.  :-)
evanofelipe
evanofelipe - 4 years ago
Thanks for sharing. You've given a great insight into caring for your boat and the ability to reason 'outcomes' ahead of situations that could otherwise lead to problems. Realising your boat was comfortable with the conditions even though you personally would have preferred to be some place else demonstrated good 'skipper' qualities, you deserved to feel very happy with yourself. Very satisfying and a great relief to eventually make Port safely and reflect on the journey. Well done.
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 4 years ago
Thanks for the kind words.   An alternative approach would have been to run downwind with the storm which might have reduced stress on the rigging.   I didn't for two reasons: 1)  As a solo sailor, I couldn't hand steer for 24+ hours to avoid being turned sideways by the waves, and 2) running would have kept me in the storm even longer, and then I would have had to beat back 150 NM additional miles to get to destination.   I note that about 15 other boats arrived in port within a day of my arrival who came from the west (with the storm).   It appeared that they had as much, or even more damage than I did coming from the East (headed into the storm).
Esnault Sylvie
Esnault Sylvie - 4 years ago
Quelle aventure, nous venons de parcourir les quelques vidéos, trop sympa cette découverte des Açores , Isabelle y a donc laissé ses empruntes, bravo au capitaine , nos amitiés de Sylvie & Gérard
Fred Haïku
Fred Haïku - 4 years ago
Très fier de toi mon oncle, tu es un vrai aventurier ! Magnifique témoignage !
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 3 years ago
Tu es le bienvenu comme toujours. Viens vite !
Fred Haïku
Fred Haïku - 3 years ago
Je suis très admiratif par tes aventures sportives, j'ai hâte de venir faire du bateau avec toi ! A bientôt Patrick
Patrick Laine
Patrick Laine - 4 years ago
Frédéric, merci pour le soutien moral, mais ne compte pas sur moi pour te suivre pour les stages d'apnée ;). A+   Passe nous voir et on fait une petite sortie en mer ensemble.

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