Just About Sailing July 2016 - Single handed Tiller Pilot test plus whoops, Port or Starboard?

Finally some decent sailing weather to test out my newly fitted Lazyjacks. And why not try out my recently repaired Tiller Pilot at the same time. All in all a really nice day out. But there's always room for a few mistakes...

Just About Sailing July 2016 - Single handed Tiller Pilot test plus whoops, Port or Starboard? sentiment_very_dissatisfied 0

Sailing 5 years ago 5,028 views

Finally some decent sailing weather to test out my newly fitted Lazyjacks. And why not try out my recently repaired Tiller Pilot at the same time. All in all a really nice day out. But there's always room for a few mistakes...

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for Just About Sailing July 2016 - Single handed Tiller Pilot test plus whoops, Port or Starboard?

3DPDK
3DPDK - 4 years ago
My boat, Chris Craft, Apache 37, tends to walk to port in reverse. I just docked last week under the same conditions but with 15 knt wind, port, broadside. I angled into the slip with bow aimed for the left corner (finger dock and main dock joint) with a little more headway than you had in the video. With about one to two meters distance to the main dock, I reverse my drive. The wheel begins walking the stern to port and I maintain my rudder for a slight port turn to keep the bow in place until all headway is off. The boat has started a spin, actually rotating from the forward quarter, with enough momentum to put the drive in neutral and bump into the finger dock fenders. If no one is on the dock to help, set up a spring line (before getting to the dock, of course) from the midships bit with the eye as the free end. Loop the finger dock cleat furthest out and engage forward drive with now rudder to starboard until the spring line tightens. Keep the drive engaged to hold to the dock, allowing you to secure all other lines.
However:
From my Shipboard Standards of Conduct - sometimes the winds supersede captain's (or dock master's) orders! ;)
3DPDK
3DPDK - 4 years ago
Well, having maintained a "free weekend docking", 500 foot dock on the Intracoastal Waterway for three years, I can say with some authority that it does tend to create frequent maintenance work on dock cleats, so I guess I understand the Association's view on spring line docking. ;)
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 4 years ago
Excellent comment.  Serenity also walks to Port in reverse.  I will always dock Port-to if given a choice.  Unfortunately n this case I was simply being very complacent and was so totally used to the West winds of the Bristol Channel that I didn't register that it was Southerly on this day (even though I had just been sailing in it).  My complacent approach is to drift slowly in neutral and then just a touch of reverse to push the stern it I then just hop of and tie a mid line - this only works with certain wind conditions.  I am a great fan of the spring approach you suggest.  I had a go at demonstrating it at the end of my SeaFeather video (November 2916?).  For some reason the RYA (Royal Yachting Association) are not keen on using a spring and engine power to keep a boat held to the dock.  However, I find that in strong winds pushing you off, this is the only single handed technique that works every time.  I also use a reverse version of this for leaving a finger dock single handed. Thanks again.
Geoff Wright
Geoff Wright - 4 years ago
Another nice video, thank you. 'They' say the lead for the sheet to the track car should be about 45 degrees to set it better. I have a rather large Genoa on my 22 footer, with a short track for the car so I have setting probs too. My winch is not far off the track end, so I'm stuck with the problem - unless I furl the Genoa a bit, which defeats the object of a larger Genoa!
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 4 years ago
I have played with the setup quite a bit since this video.  My Genoa is large and it seems to be best not fully unfurled - unless beating in up to about 16 knots when I put the car right back, past the winch, and tighten it as much as possible - the Genoa is then inside the guardwires.  WIth some wind directions the sheets tangle up with the guardwires - I should really pass the sheet under the lower one.  But that is too much faffing around, so I tend to just move the car so that the sheets don't snag and then adjust everything else.  A bit lazy of me I know.
Manning Harvey
Manning Harvey - 5 years ago
excellent video. Nothing to confess to there. In safe and no damage. About the luffing foresail. Try adjusting your genoa car A little more forward and get the sheet off the lifeline stantion. I will bet you will see better results.
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
Thanks for the comment.  I will try what you suggest.  I did also try fiddling about with the leech line (something I have never touched before).  Cheers.
Someday Maybe
Someday Maybe - 5 years ago
Whenever I watch sailing videos I'm thinking about getting a boat and get going :) So calm and pieceful as well... At times at least :)
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
Go for it.  I only regret that it took me so long to actually get round to getting a boat.  On a good day nothing quite beats the peace and tranquillity of moving along with nothing but the wind to propel you.
Sailing Harley Quinn
Sailing Harley Quinn - 5 years ago
You might want to push the jib traveller forward to increase the angle on the sheet to pull the sail more downwards and increase it's tightness.
Sailing Harley Quinn
Sailing Harley Quinn - 5 years ago
Just about sailing The traveller on mine is almost 2m long so have a lot of scope for adjustment but the boat was designed to use a 150% genoa. Quite common on 1970s boats
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
I did try out your suggestion.  Worked a treat. Have a look at August plus One (I think).  Unless I am anything but close hauled it works best if I push the traveller quite a bit forward.  It also solves the problem of the sheets catching on the safety lines.  Oh, and tweaking the leach line helped to.  I am always happy to get suggestions.
Sailing Harley Quinn
Sailing Harley Quinn - 5 years ago
you got in without injury or damage so it's ok in my book.
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
It's very public when you dock in a harbour. Loads of people leaning over the railing eating ice creams watching.  I guess that most people will not have noticed a thing. - You just have to keep a straight face and pretend that was the way you meant to do it all along.
Taras Kalapun
Taras Kalapun - 5 years ago
Front sail - pull the leech line
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
Thanks.  I didn't try that - but I will.  Furling in a bit helped.  I need to go out for the day and just play with the sails.
Glup Po
Glup Po - 5 years ago
Nice video
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
Thanks
Sailing Vessel Southern Lady
Sailing Vessel Southern Lady - 5 years ago
Thanks for confessing! He who is without sin can cast the first stone.
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
Well, they say that experience comes by learning from our mistakes - so by my logic mistakes are a good thing.

10. comment for Just About Sailing July 2016 - Single handed Tiller Pilot test plus whoops, Port or Starboard?

mjcooke2
mjcooke2 - 5 years ago
I'm not an expert sail trimmer and all for leaving things alone rather than tweaking but having the genoa car further forward if the sail is reefed should pull the leach tighter and stop the fluttering, further back when the sail is fully unrolled. Also the sheet looks like it needs to go under the lifeline. I thought that was a good 'landing' at the pontoon. Have a good cruise next month.
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
I think I need to spend a good day just playing with the sail.  I only tried a furling fore sail for the first time a couple of years ago,  I do like the convenience.  In the end I furled it in a bit which seemed to work,  What is it pilots say - a good landing is one you can walk away from, a brilliant landing is one where the plane can take off again later.
James Davis
James Davis - 5 years ago
Looks like you are having fun. Any chance Serenity is going to make it out of that brown soup called the Bristol Channel to stretch her sea legs any time soon?
Just about sailing
Just about sailing - 5 years ago
Plans are still ongoing to escape the gravy brown, wavy brown Bristol Channel. It would be lovely to be somewhere where you can actually see through the water.

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